Forums  > Software  > Java for finance  
     
Page 1 of 3Goto to page: [1], 2, 3 Next
Display using:  

Crassus


Total Posts: 1194
Joined: May 2004
 
Posted: 2004-08-06 14:41

I have an opportunity to learn and practice java.  Is this a good move (I already have done c++)?  Is java widespread in front offices and finance systems? 


Baltazar


Total Posts: 1765
Joined: Jul 2004
 
Posted: 2004-08-06 14:51
my two cents are that it won't take you much time
expect for specific stuff (no pointer in java for example, garbage collector and other memory managment tricks)

it is quite the same.

i'd say it's a good move, at least to impress RH,
but i don't know if it's wide spread

Qui fait le malin tombe dans le ravin

MrBen


Total Posts: 138
Joined: Jun 2004
 
Posted: 2004-08-06 15:36
Very good move and I think inevitable anyway. You will find Java
alot more friendly than C++, and not much slower on a desktop.

You can also scale up (get more boxes), distribute, web-enable,
load-balance, make it tranactioanal with Java (J2SE, J2EE) or its
cousin C# (.NET); which are all not really viable in C++.

Crassus


Total Posts: 1194
Joined: May 2004
 
Posted: 2004-08-06 16:23
I was a little hesitant at first, but I guess it's another string to the bow.  Thanks for the input, guys.

electrical


Total Posts: 47
Joined: Jan 2006
 
Posted: 2007-04-09 09:44
I know it has been a while, but can you suggest a book to quickly pick up java with (I too know C++)?

Browsing on Amazon has not led to much. The books that turn up there are Head First Java (I am cringing at the idea of reading that, but apparently people like it), Core Java 2, and Bruce Eckel's books. Any plugs for/against any of those?

Thanks in advance.

Dimatrix


Total Posts: 539
Joined: May 2006
 
Posted: 2007-04-09 10:06
Since you know C++, I think there's no need to buy a whole Java book, since most of it will be introduction to syntax and object oriented languages. Since you're looking for something to pick it up quickly, why don't you use free available tutorials in the internet? Sun has tutorials which I found helpfull in the beginning. I would recommend to download eclipse for free and start straight away with the tutorial.

Ctrl - L.

MadMax


Total Posts: 424
Joined: Feb 2006
 
Posted: 2007-04-09 13:40
I second Sun's tutorial. Core Java 2 is a good book to learn from and to use as a reference. A very nice book is Java After Hours where there are 10 projects with solutions.

tristanreid


Total Posts: 1677
Joined: Aug 2005
 
Posted: 2007-04-09 16:03

Another agreement with both of Dimatrix's recommendations. Sun's tutorial is free, and is actually a great source in general for 'how to do X'. Eclipse is great, I also use it for C/C++ development, although not if I'm using microsoft c++. 

Eclipse has plugins that allow you to design Java guis visually, but I've had mixed experience with that part. It works, and it actually might help you understand java layout better to use it, but you have to learn how to do all your initialization in such a way that the plugin expects.

Speaking of layout, there was a book about 10 years ago that was the definitive guide to learning java layout. I'll be wracking my brains, unfortunately I can't place it right now.

-t.


the only reason it would be easier to program in C is that you can't easily express complex problems in C, so you don't. -comp.lang.lisp

signalseeker


Total Posts: 237
Joined: Oct 2006
 
Posted: 2007-04-09 16:55
If you already know programming you need these 2 books:
1. Java precisely - Thin and elgant, it is a good programmers intro to java.
2. Effective Java programming guide by bloch - This is the equivalent of myers c++ books to java.

you can do some serious work with these two book. Sun's books are good and cheap, but I have always found them too verbose for my taste.

Both eclipse and netbeans are excellent ides and they are free. There are tons of open source projects where you can look at good java code.

The dark is light enough.

electrical


Total Posts: 47
Joined: Jan 2006
 
Posted: 2007-04-10 01:03
Thanks. "Java Precisely" seems to be what I was looking for, and it is on its way to me. I was looking for a (hard-copy) book because I am spending a lot of time commuting - at that time my brain is shut to the point that anything heavier (than basics of a programming language) would not be palatable. I need to pick up Java in a hurry, and want to use the commute time plus some code-writing in the small hours...

Thanks for the links to the online tutorials though - is is handy to have them.

semanticum


Total Posts: 57
Joined: Feb 2007
 
Posted: 2007-04-10 09:00

electrical,

"The books that turn up there are Head First Java (I am cringing at the idea of reading that, but apparently people like it), Core Java 2, and Bruce Eckel's books. Any plugs for/against any of those? "

As you know C++ already I think that the Head First Java book is too simple for you. The concept is very compelling but I still prefer the usual approach of programming language textbooks.

I recommend to read this book:

Effective Java Programming Language Guide by Joshua Bloch

This book is full of useful tips and tricks and delivers a lot of new insights even for experienced programmers.

 

Further, you may have a look a this book:

Java Methods for Financial Engineering Philip Barker

Be careful: The book is new and no reviews have been written so far.  And it is quite pricy: US$ 79.95.

 

Dominik


FDAXHunter
Founding Member

Total Posts: 8362
Joined: Mar 2004
 
Posted: 2007-04-10 09:02
Or you could just forget about the whole Java thing. It is sooo 90s, after all.

(Sorry, couldn't resist Smiley)

The Figs Protocol.

electrical


Total Posts: 47
Joined: Jan 2006
 
Posted: 2007-04-10 10:10
Or you could just forget about the whole Java thing. It is sooo 90s, after all.

Actually, I won't mind doing exactly that - but that doesn't mean I can. Smiley

signalseeker


Total Posts: 237
Joined: Oct 2006
 
Posted: 2007-04-10 16:14
> Or you could just forget about the whole Java thing. It is sooo 90s, after all.

I second that, but sadly java is perhaps the only way to go if one needs a productive and statically typed language/environment on a unix platform.

The dark is light enough.

Nonius
Founding Member
Nonius Unbound
Total Posts: 12736
Joined: Mar 2004
 
Posted: 2012-04-20 15:31
Are e 90s coming back yet?

Anyone looked at this...http://code.google.com/p/jbooktrader/

Chiral is Tyler Durden

nikol


Total Posts: 519
Joined: Jun 2005
 
Posted: 2012-06-12 11:20

> Anyone looked at this...http://code.google.com/p/jbooktrader/

EDITED: appears, i made comments about other system (jbooktrader). sorry, for confusion.

looked it maybe 3 years ago. OOP wise it was very advanced, but I had impression not fit for HF (maybe now has changed). i borrowed quite some programming (design) ideas from it. i think jsystemtrader is initiated by same author.

recently i discovered this. http://code.google.com/p/tradelink/    functionally (not by frond-end and appearance) does very close to what i have done myself, but i am tempted to move into this as to leverage on others people's developments. so have to decide if i want to devote my time into this.


etuka2


Total Posts: 156
Joined: Jun 2004
 
Posted: 2012-06-12 16:48
Tradelink doesn't appear to be Java - requires .NET/mono to build.

redandtheblue


Total Posts: 356
Joined: Aug 2007
 
Posted: 2012-06-13 01:33
tradelink looks really active, but I have never tried it or marketcetera

nikol


Total Posts: 519
Joined: Jun 2005
 
Posted: 2012-06-13 15:10

tried marketcetera. didnt like much.

came to conclusion that own Java API + http://esper.codehaus.org/ can give something similar. esper site gives examples related to realtime trade analysis to give you impression.

once you register your java classes into esper engine, then you can build triggers upon your sql-like (esper-driven) analysis within your application.


nikol


Total Posts: 519
Joined: Jun 2005
 
Posted: 2012-06-13 15:12

> Tradelink doesn't appear to be Java - requires .NET/mono to build.

very true. if you focus on bulding strategy (without engaging into difficult hamletian language choices) then it might be an option.


nadtim


Total Posts: 8
Joined: Jun 2012
 
Posted: 2012-07-06 17:54
Something to consider is whether or not you will need a FPGA for your system.

Another thing to consider is whether or not you will need to secure your code by encrypting jar files.

Another thing to consider is Garbage Collection freezing your application when you scale up.

There are solutions for all of these items.

GhostRider


Total Posts: 2
Joined: May 2011
 
Posted: 2012-09-05 08:56
Hi there,

Java is for sure ok for many applications in finance. Just look at LMAX, they also do fast stuff. Don't use this CEP stuff, it's just a marketing buzz like Cloud Computing. Can mean anything.

Cheers.

silverside


Total Posts: 1412
Joined: Jun 2004
 
Posted: 2012-09-07 00:22
GS Collections is a collections framework for Java. It has JDK-compatible List, Set and Map implementations with a rich API and set of utility classes that work with any JDK compatible Collections, Arrays, Maps or Strings. The iteration protocol was inspired by the Smalltalk collection framework.

link

braincat


Total Posts: 343
Joined: Oct 2004
 
Posted: 2012-09-07 01:18
http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/159373/what-backs-up-the-claim-that-c-can-be-faster-than-a-jvm-or-clr-with-jit

One of the better discussions of issues, java vs. c++
I used java for a year and hated it. Went back to c++.

signalseeker


Total Posts: 237
Joined: Oct 2006
 
Posted: 2012-09-07 15:20
@silverside

Have you used guava? I would be curious how GS collections compare to guava. Thanks.

The dark is light enough.
Previous Thread :: Next Thread 
Page 1 of 3Goto to page: [1], 2, 3 Next