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TSWP


Total Posts: 360
Joined: May 2012
 
Posted: 2015-12-23 14:31
>How good is the reliability and speed of internet connections and the reliability of the electricity supply in the Caribbean/Bahamas?

Depends on the island.
- Bahamas in Nassau has optic fiber and I know funds there that do remote into US servers for operating trades on a daily basis, they said it is usually reliable
- Cayman Islands has optic fiber as well and seems to very well developed in this sense, more than Bahamas
However the speed certainly cannot compete with what you get in US or London.
Other places may have good DSL or wireless 3/4G connections up to 10Mbits download but not as good as Bahamas or Cayman.

Check this cable map to get an idea of the internet cables reaching the various islands:
http://www.submarinecablemap.com/

Electricity supply is usually good on the most developed islands and backed up by local diesel generators for emergencies, although if your island is hit by a hurricane you could be left without grid electricity for days.

The only thing that counts: can you make money?

svisstack


Total Posts: 290
Joined: Feb 2014
 
Posted: 2015-12-23 14:34
>> I don't get why people tend to dislike the cold so much. Personally, I like having snow around in winter. I would say an opportunity to go skiing before/after work is probably more valuable for me than the warm weather all the year round and an ocean nearby.

agree

Time well wasted.

goldorak


Total Posts: 979
Joined: Nov 2004
 
Posted: 2015-12-23 14:56
> I would say an opportunity to go skiing before/after work is probably more valuable for me than the warm weather all the year round and an ocean nearby.

You mean skiing DURING work hours? There are enough bad days all year long for work. Evil Grin

If you are not living on the edge you are taking up too much space.

aickley


Total Posts: 37
Joined: Oct 2008
 
Posted: 2015-12-23 16:18
@goldorak
Not trained enough to do cross-country all the day) Sent you a PM.

MrBen


Total Posts: 137
Joined: Jun 2004
 
Posted: 2016-11-06 13:48
I have lived on small Island for more than 10 years now....

Living on a small place (in population terms) is like living in village/small town on mainland except that unlike in village/small town you cannot drive to nearby City for culture (in broad sense), and to travel easily to see friends and family. The way you need to work around this is factor in making trips to the mainland, and work out practically how this would happen (are weekend trips viable and to where?). Saying that, as others have said if you like outdoors such places are ideal. Such places also have village like feel and dynamic and decide if that's your cup of tea. I would say if you move to a small new community (like Island) get involved in whatever the locals are doing. Most people move to such places for business reasons but some never get involved in anything and end up miserable, lonely and living ultimately pointless existence.




rickyvic


Total Posts: 117
Joined: Jul 2013
 
Posted: 2016-11-09 22:44
I agree too skiing during working hours is good for you!

"amicus Plato sed magis amica Veritas"

TSWP


Total Posts: 360
Joined: May 2012
 
Posted: 2016-12-11 23:09
I have a question for anyone currently working at a hedge fund in an offshore non-taxed location, that could be Singapore or Bahamas, Cayman, BVI, etc.

Here is the question:

do you happen to know why the owner of the fund where you work did set up physically the fund offshore? could you summarize their logic here in a few bullet points?

I am curious to hear what are the main drivers that lead some managers to set up their shop offshore, away from the major financial centers.

The only thing that counts: can you make money?

darkmatters


Total Posts: 66
Joined: Nov 2010
 
Posted: 2016-12-12 04:04
The weather is fantastic and there are no income taxes. If you don't take outside money, those can be huge advantages.

HitmanH


Total Posts: 422
Joined: Apr 2005
 
Posted: 2016-12-12 11:21
Cheaper to get going than needing an onshore manager - lack of personal income tax (unless US or one of those countries that taxes on global); nice lifestyle, cheap(er) childcare / schooling / home-help.

TSWP


Total Posts: 360
Joined: May 2012
 
Posted: 2017-01-09 19:41
Do any of you guys agree it is more difficult to get talented people to come down and work permanently at a fund located offshore, say the Cayman Islands, versus a more typical London or New York-based fund?



The only thing that counts: can you make money?

darkmatters


Total Posts: 66
Joined: Nov 2010
 
Posted: 2017-01-09 21:27
Yes, much harder. But easier to keep them.
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