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polysena


Total Posts: 1039
Joined: Nov 2007
 
Posted: 2016-01-25 14:59
Is it just I or other mathematically trained NPers share with me this view that the following advertised program over two days is mostly unreasonnable?

refresher?

Just to make it clear_ I am not considering it for myself... given my background I could teach the course.. This is why it makes me slightly irritated that people sell a package like this (not for cheap) and make believe that the course consumer will end up in really improving their skills...

Свобода - это то, что у меня внутри. (Ленинград и Кипелов - "Свобода")

silverside


Total Posts: 1408
Joined: Jun 2004
 
Posted: 2016-01-25 16:10
It's "all over the place", it seems.

Back when I did my MSc we started with a refresher on what we called " fundamental tools". Even with a motivated and selected group, it took 3 pretty intense days to get through a few basic mathematical concepts - from memory, mainly linear algebra (eigenvalues and eigenvectors) and real analysis (ode's and maybe pde's) . was very useful. But I suspect you'd do better working through Schaum's notes yourself.

Cheng


Total Posts: 2814
Joined: Feb 2005
 
Posted: 2016-01-25 16:20
Two words: forget it.

Way too many different topics in close to no time. You could easily spend one day on each of the topics mentioned, without the workshops. This might be a nice 2 week course, though.

"He's man, he's a kid / Wanna bang with you / Headbanging man" (Grave Digger, Headbanging Man)

jslade


Total Posts: 1064
Joined: Feb 2007
 
Posted: 2016-01-28 02:09
I met a former medallion portfolio manager once. I remember him asking something like "what's a CFA?" I guess, someone who goes to courses like that.

"Learning, n. The kind of ignorance distinguishing the studious."

MCgeneratedname


Total Posts: 143
Joined: Dec 2013
 
Posted: 2016-01-28 10:41
Companies need to give some treats to their employees for their "career"-development.
There is a cottage industry (especially here in England/London) that caters to this demand.
Nothing to do with usefulness.

silverside


Total Posts: 1408
Joined: Jun 2004
 
Posted: 2016-01-28 11:50
It's a good question though : if staff don't have the time or motivation to do a full course such as CFA, PRM, etc, how to find and evaluate a useful alternative?? Just thinking about technical side for now - for general management skills there are also many providers.


MCgeneratedname


Total Posts: 143
Joined: Dec 2013
 
Posted: 2016-01-28 12:27
The evaluation part is the difficult bit.
I think the online courses (coursera, udacity) are trying to jump into this: They use credible lecturers from known universities.

They work quite well if you want to learn a specific technical skill. And there is a certificate at the end if you are willing to pay.
Only downside is the image problem they still have.

polysena


Total Posts: 1039
Joined: Nov 2007
 
Posted: 2016-01-28 19:15
Well even if companies need to give some treats to their employees, it is in my view wasted money the employee probably learns basically nothing, and the company throws money through the window.. waste

Свобода - это то, что у меня внутри. (Ленинград и Кипелов - "Свобода")

MCgeneratedname


Total Posts: 143
Joined: Dec 2013
 
Posted: 2016-01-28 21:08
haha... have you ever worked in a large company or organisation where people think in terms of budgets?
wasting money/time/resources is at the core of every decision.

polysena


Total Posts: 1039
Joined: Nov 2007
 
Posted: 2016-01-28 21:54
Yes call me naive but still, just useless.. and a complete sham make people believe that they will learn maths in 5 secs...

Свобода - это то, что у меня внутри. (Ленинград и Кипелов - "Свобода")

Nonius
Founding Member
Nonius Unbound
Total Posts: 12666
Joined: Mar 2004
 
Posted: 2016-02-09 21:15
that looks sooooo boring, not only to "learn" but to also to "teach". there's a cottage industry out there for ripping people off on these types of courses. The guys doing it probably think, heh, this is a good gig, but how in the fuck do scale something like that?

I wouldn't mind launching a new independent primary school in London that has an insanely hard entrance exam just for math geniuses and costs a fortune (3x Harvard's fees or something like that); that kind of thing, like the most selective nightclubs, has the twisted logic that if its even more and more expensive and harder and harder to get in, it becomes even more popular.

Chiral is Tyler Durden

polysena


Total Posts: 1039
Joined: Nov 2007
 
Posted: 2016-02-09 21:33
Nonius,
1. boring just an understatement...
2. Need to program a robot to teach that & multiple choice answers..
3. hmm math geniuses should attend for free... they are interesting kids to teach.. even perhsp better than oneself :-)


Свобода - это то, что у меня внутри. (Ленинград и Кипелов - "Свобода")

Nonius
Founding Member
Nonius Unbound
Total Posts: 12666
Joined: Mar 2004
 
Posted: 2016-02-10 06:45
by the way, one of your compatriots runs such school at a location that I understand is (allegedly) a front for a certain government's (I leave it to your imagination) foreign intelligence service. (well, not 3x harvard fees). true on teaching smart kids. when I was a visiting professor at a college, one of the students was a child prodigy- 11 years old. he was definitely fun to teach.

on your second point, a friend of mine did pretty much just that for SAT tests. made a small fortune in online training.

Chiral is Tyler Durden

polysena


Total Posts: 1039
Joined: Nov 2007
 
Posted: 2016-02-10 10:14
yes nothing new there were always "specialised schools for gifted in maths". Basically Russia and France share a same high level centralised state philosophical view on the importance of mathematics in the society (mathematics as a vector of progress)... (I know less about China).

As for teaching maths, there is a sub-domain in psychology called mathematical psychology where researchers come from op research, CS, combinatorics and also from pure psychology, they attempt to model the process by which people learn and also design of optimal "questionnaires" to filter skills and aptitudes correctly. They do some interesting stuff. Names to look for János Dezső Aczél , "Jean-Claude Falmagne tTogether with Jean-Paul Doignon, he developed knowledge space theory, which is the mathematical foundation for the ALEKS software for the assessment of knowledge in various academic subjects, including K-12 mathematics, chemistry, and accounting."

https://www.aleks.com/

In 1985, Falmagne, along with Jean-Paul Doignon, wrote “Spaces for the Assessment of Knowledge”.[3] In this article, they presented a formal framework for the assessment of knowledge in various academic subjects, such as arithmetic, algebra, and chemistry. This early framework was combinatoric in character, and as such insufficient for a practical assessment, which is unavoidably plagued by careless errors on the part of the test takers. In time, they created a stochastic framework for the description of the evolution of an assessment, question by question.[4] With extensive financial support from the National Science Foundation, their work on the stochastic framework led to the creation of the web-based system ALEKS for the assessment and learning of mathematics and science. Falmagne and Doignon's 2011 book, Learning Spaces,[5] contains the most current presentation and development of the stochastic framework for the assessment of knowledge. Learning spaces are specific kinds of knowledge spaces, whose best applications are to situations where assessments guide efficient learning. Learning spaces are a part of the concept of Media Theory,[6] which explores the modeling of knowledge structures and knowledge states. More generally, these lines of research are collectively called Knowledge Space Theory and are being pursued by many investigators, mostly in Austria, Germany, and the Netherlands.

Свобода - это то, что у меня внутри. (Ленинград и Кипелов - "Свобода")

MCgeneratedname


Total Posts: 143
Joined: Dec 2013
 
Posted: 2016-02-11 10:03
Nonius is such a tease... (i like spy stories)

Whenever I meet people who worked for the UK version of the NSA I get the impression that their work is not very interesting or innovative.
Rather pencil pushing.

So is that school some kind of recruitment tool? Because if the kids choose to go down that career path they don't seem all that genius to me. And if it is a trap why didn't they see it coming?

h0h0


Total Posts: 39
Joined: Apr 2010
 
Posted: 2016-02-11 13:33
working on projects like "Karma Police" does not provide enough intellectual stimulation?

MCgeneratedname


Total Posts: 143
Joined: Dec 2013
 
Posted: 2016-02-11 14:16
it provides some kind of stimulation, alright
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