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chiral3
Founding Member

Total Posts: 5022
Joined: Mar 2004
 
Posted: 2016-02-19 01:53
I've read many good books in the past few months. Sad this one ended... recommended to the people on this forum who like fiction and wished Franzen would write about something close to home.


A Doubter's Almanac: A Novel

Nonius is Satoshi Nakamoto. 物の哀れ

tabris


Total Posts: 1247
Joined: Feb 2005
 
Posted: 2016-03-08 04:33
Been recently reading the chinese sci fi that got translated not too long ago the three body problem. Think some folks here might like it

Dilbert: Why does it seem as though I am the only honest guy on earth? Dogbert: Your type tends not to reproduce.

akimon


Total Posts: 566
Joined: Dec 2004
 
Posted: 2016-03-08 09:54
I really liked this one. The english audiobook for three body problem is not bad too.

Plouffy


Total Posts: 46
Joined: Feb 2012
 
Posted: 2016-03-11 16:45
Followin chiral3's suggestion I've just finished A Doubter's Almanac. A very good (if not quite long) read. The last few chapters were very emotional :)

chiral3
Founding Member

Total Posts: 5022
Joined: Mar 2004
 
Posted: 2016-03-12 15:28
Speaking of Chinese translations - a couple of years ago I read Decoded by Mai Jai. I really enjoyed it. I bought the Chinese version, even though I can't read Chinese, on the off chance that one day I will be able to read and speak Chinese. I've loaned it to several Chinese friends / employees. They liked it.

Nonius is Satoshi Nakamoto. 物の哀れ

etuka2


Total Posts: 155
Joined: Jun 2004
 
Posted: 2016-03-12 23:24
Three Body Problem and its sequel The Dark Forest are top class, imaginative science fiction. Thoroughly recommended.

afekz


Total Posts: 27
Joined: Jun 2010
 
Posted: 2016-03-17 08:29
Ok, so it's DEC15, but:
Beyond the Galaxy - Ethan Siegel

The best way I can describe the level at which this is written is as a textbook for a single semester, first year astronomy course for non-science majors. It's an up-to-date and easy-to-read summary of the history and state of modern cosmology, with enough detail to keep me entertained and involved throughout its 386 pages.

A good way to evaluate whether it'll be to taste would be to read a few of ES's astronomy/cosmology[1] blog posts on Medium, at
Starts with a Bang.

[1] The recent ones titled "No, Science is not Faith-based" and "Ask Ethan: Is This Actually a Hole in the Universe?" can be safely ignored for purposes of evaluating whether you'd enjoy the book or not.

AB12358


Total Posts: 50
Joined: Apr 2014
 
Posted: 2016-05-16 11:39
I found Lisa: A Chess Novel by GM Jesse Kraai quite interesting.

jslade


Total Posts: 1097
Joined: Feb 2007
 
Posted: 2016-05-16 19:06
In keeping with my historical novel interests, I'm really digging the Prohaska tetralogy by John Biggins. "A Sailor of Austria" was great, and "The Emperor's Coloured Coat" is shaping up to be a lot of fun as well. Same basic idea as the Flashman series, except taking place in the Austro-Hungarian empire. This is escapist junk food, mind you; no deep literature, here, but well written and with a lot of amusing historical details.

"Learning, n. The kind of ignorance distinguishing the studious."

chiral3
Founding Member

Total Posts: 5022
Joined: Mar 2004
 
Posted: 2016-05-16 19:42
I just started the Jazz of Physics/

Nonius is Satoshi Nakamoto. 物の哀れ

jslade


Total Posts: 1097
Joined: Feb 2007
 
Posted: 2016-05-16 23:08
Stephon was my roomie in college. Nice guy. Haven't read the book yet. Speaking of Perimeter guys, Carlo Rovelli's book is reputedly very good.

"Learning, n. The kind of ignorance distinguishing the studious."

chiral3
Founding Member

Total Posts: 5022
Joined: Mar 2004
 
Posted: 2016-05-16 23:11
That's great. Small world.

Nonius is Satoshi Nakamoto. 物の哀れ

chiral3
Founding Member

Total Posts: 5022
Joined: Mar 2004
 
Posted: 2016-05-16 23:34
BTW - he's been in the news lately for more than just his book. Not that it's relevant to the book.

Nonius is Satoshi Nakamoto. 物の哀れ

Rashomon


Total Posts: 171
Joined: Mar 2011
 
Posted: 2016-07-06 02:09
Chocolate Wars by Deborah Cadbury
Empire of Cotton by Sven Beckert
Failing Law Schools by Brian Z Tamanaha
The Math Myth by Andrew Hacker

Each worth a skim / hour or two. Beckert's falls under the recent trend of econo-historical synechdoche (Cod, The Box, The Potato). Tamanaha's is very well argued; Hacker's pretty well argued.

Cadbury's is my favorite of the above. Touches on the Quaker roots of British capitalism. Faith compelled George Cadbury to disinherit his heirs, instead using his wealth to build a model village with the hope of freeing society of the Dickensian evils of late-19th-century city living.

"My hands are small, I know, but they're not yours, they are my own. And they're, not yours, they are my own." ~ Jewel
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