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Jurassic


Total Posts: 105
Joined: Mar 2018
 
Posted: 2018-05-26 11:47
How do you guys start using a new programming language (assuming you have competency in one other beforehand).

Do you read a couple of standard books first?

Do you just jump straight in and google around to find how to specific things one at a time?

katastrofa


Total Posts: 451
Joined: Jul 2008
 
Posted: 2018-05-26 22:16
The 2nd.

Maggette


Total Posts: 1046
Joined: Jun 2007
 
Posted: 2018-05-27 01:11
Depends. A little bit of both.

If it is a language that is very close to the other stuff I die, I tend to read one or two tutorials first and start coding. This happend after 3 years of .net living to Java.

But often a language was designed with a certain purpose in mind. So ist doesn't hurt to understand that purpose, which is a theoretical concept and should (or can not) be learned from stack overflow but by reading a book or a paper. Sometimes the purpose of a language ist to do stuff different than in the language you are used to (like torturing Scala with vars and for loops)

And IMHO besides the language itself, often the framework and the ecosystem are as important (understanding .Net when coding C#, understanding JVM and build tools when using java etc).

Ich kam hierher und sah dich und deine Leute lächeln, und sagte mir: Maggette, scheiss auf den small talk, lass lieber deine Fäuste sprechen...

Strange


Total Posts: 1419
Joined: Jun 2004
 
Posted: 2018-05-27 05:11
I am in the same boat as @katastrofa. Sometimes I go back and correct the code I wrote in the early stages.

PS. @Maggette is the smart one here, listen to her

I don't interest myself in 'why?'. I think more often in terms of 'when?'...sometimes 'where?'. And always how much?'

katastrofa


Total Posts: 451
Joined: Jul 2008
 
Posted: 2018-05-27 11:07
Of course, you need to read some introduction to the language, to see what it's about. But I don't read more than 10-20 pages before starting to experiment. After I get a "feel" for the language, I can return to reading more, and I can absorb the knowledge better.

Jurassic


Total Posts: 105
Joined: Mar 2018
 
Posted: 2018-05-27 11:14
This kind of leads to another question... what frameworks do you need to know to call yourself a (quant) developer in that language? Essentially I would imagine it would some kind of numerical library and the ability to build a rest api

katastrofa


Total Posts: 451
Joined: Jul 2008
 
Posted: 2018-05-27 15:18
What's a REST API? ;-)

AB12358


Total Posts: 55
Joined: Apr 2014
 
Posted: 2018-05-28 07:17
https://linux.die.net/man/3/sleep

Patrik
Founding Member

Total Posts: 1354
Joined: Mar 2004
 
Posted: 2018-05-28 14:07
I'm often on the other end of the spectrum. I'm quite happy to read/skim 1 or 2 books straight through over a few days without touching a keyboard at all. If I still feel there's some merit after that I pick some small project and put fingers to keyboard. Tends to be quicker for me, and is subjectively more fulfilling for me as I have a chance to pick up the "ethos" of the language without hitting my head against the wall by trial and error.

Comes down to personality and how you prefer to learn - there's no general "better" way that will apply to everyone.

Capital Structure Demolition LLC Radiation

Jurassic


Total Posts: 105
Joined: Mar 2018
 
Posted: 2018-05-28 18:28
> What's a REST API? ;-)

But seriously what is a quant dev expected to know?

katastrofa


Total Posts: 451
Joined: Jul 2008
 
Posted: 2018-05-28 22:14
IMHO a quant dev is supposed to:

1. understand quant finance enough to implement a quant trading system / pricing model after some other people, who are at hand to answer questions and respond to suggestions for improvements, did the R&D
2. be able to pick up any technology which is needed to do 1. and get to "reasonably proficient" stage in it (be it REST, Angular, Django, Boost, Automatic Differentiation, XML parsers, Scala, Hadoop, Spark, KDB, whatever) - not to be an expert in it, though
3. be an expert in at least one of these: Python, C++, Java or C#.

Jurassic


Total Posts: 105
Joined: Mar 2018
 
Posted: 2018-05-29 20:42
Angular is (ironically) the hardest technology there, I can never get a frontend to look any good...
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