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jslade


Total Posts: 1168
Joined: Feb 2007
 
Posted: 2019-01-14 18:52
Does anyone have hacks for spending greater than 90 days in Schengen-zone? I'm aware of various "buy a nice house" or "deposit half a million Euros in Bulgarian bonds" type schemes, but when I look around I rarely see people actually doing these things, and would feel like an idiot if there is some "ask real nice and X country will let you in" option.

I'm pretty self sufficient and can do my thing from any location. Probably middlin' NP level net worth, unmarried, and with lots of fancy diplomas. Would like to spend a year or two living in Europe for a lifestyle upgrade; see if I like it as much in the longer term as I do when visiting.

US citizen if it's not obvious.

"Learning, n. The kind of ignorance distinguishing the studious."

mtsm


Total Posts: 232
Joined: Dec 2010
 
Posted: 2019-01-14 19:08
No idea, but this is really interesting actually and I am intrigued. I have never come across anyone from the US having that problem I guess. It's almost always the other way around with people wanting to outstay their US tourist visa somehow.

From what I am reading here, I thought you were some kind of free-lance braindoing consulting jobs here and there. From my perspective, that of a European bi-national, naturalized US citizen, what really sucks fro anything else than a money perspective in the US is being an employee. That really gets you after a couple of years. Basically absolutely zero rights, silly vacation policies, lack of independence, free time. People live to work way too much. But when you are a "native" and successfully liberally employed, it's probably a lot better. I don't really understand then what it is that you perceive as a life style upgrade in Europe.

BTW, also, I am pretty sure you know this, as you seem well cultured and traveled, but Europe is completely meaningless and only serves as a concept for the average American to imply what lies to the easy, actually in many cases you still get the EMEA. Anyway, western european countries are very different from each other. What's amounts to a life-style upgrade in one country, definitely amounts to a life-style downgrade in another.

Actually I would not mind PM.ing you if you have time. THanks, m

Maggette


Total Posts: 1097
Joined: Jun 2007
 
Posted: 2019-01-14 19:33
What if I hire you as freelancing consultant for a research project that doesn't exist and the compensation is based on a product or research results that you will never deliver and you will cover your own expenses?

Or make you a partner without voting rights?

That sounds way to simple to be legal, but like I said, I don't know.

Ich kam hierher und sah dich und deine Leute lächeln, und sagte mir: Maggette, scheiss auf den small talk, lass lieber deine Fäuste sprechen...

jslade


Total Posts: 1168
Joined: Feb 2007
 
Posted: 2019-01-14 21:30
@mtsm: you have me fairly well pegged. I heartily agree with your assessment of employee life in the US; it's really bad, though at least the pay is somewhat higher. What I consider a lifestyle upgrade: the food is better, the architecture more pleasant to look at, and the people are more interesting to talk to. Beyond that, the levels of social decay (violent crime, cultural atomization) and day to day infrastructure (roads, trains) aren't as bad in Europe as they are in the US. Oh yeah, and it's cheaper to live in Europe than it is in the US to boot. The quality of life doesn't go up at all being a native born US citizen; you just don't notice as much because you haven't lived life in a place where things work reasonably well.

I spent the fall working remote around various Schengen places; coming back was extremely unpleasant. I could do 90 day Visa runs to Turkey or Ukraine, but it would be nice to have enough roots somewhere to rent an apartment I actually use.

@maggette: one can speculate on such things, but it seems like an immigration lawyer would be more appropriate.

"Learning, n. The kind of ignorance distinguishing the studious."

EspressoLover


Total Posts: 363
Joined: Jan 2015
 
Posted: 2019-01-14 21:32
Aren't most continental universities free or near-free? And many of the classes are pretty much just a final exam, right? So, "enroll" to get a student visa. You won't fail out until the end of the semester, so that's got you covered for a quarter. Probably even two or three, assuming they have academic probation.

Good questions outrank easy answers. -Paul Samuelson

EspressoLover


Total Posts: 363
Joined: Jan 2015
 
Posted: 2019-01-14 21:32
[duplicate]

Edit: Might as well add my $0.02 since I have a duplicate post anyway...

IMO the biggest comparative advantage to the US is affordable family formation. Things like land for a 200 square meter house with a backyard, petrol for your gas-guzzling minivan, domestic help, groceries, plastic junk from Amazon, are all pretty cheap vis-a-vis Western Europe. Plus the IRS throws in a ton of tax breaks for kids.

I would say that regarding mtsm's question, there is indeed a pretty reliable way to have a European lifestyle in the US. Get a security clearance, then become a federal contractor or employee. This should be relatively easy if you're a citizen with any sort of technical background. Pay's decent, benefits are good, stress is low, overtime is rare, and job security's high. The DC area is pretty nice too, plenty of good food and architecture. Downside is that most of the work isn't very interesting, and the upside's definitely limited.

Good questions outrank easy answers. -Paul Samuelson

jslade


Total Posts: 1168
Joined: Feb 2007
 
Posted: 2019-01-14 21:52
@Espresso: That's an interesting thought, and I suppose I could do something like cadge a post doc role at a computer science school. TBH though I just want to pay some fee and be able to stay for a year. Seems like it should be doable without investing a quarter million euros in interest free Latvian sovereign debt.

Edit add: yeah, working for the MIC is a big no. I have several pals who do it and are satisfied with it, and I coulda easily pivoted into bomb physics 20 years ago. It's not for me. I just want to drink nice wine in a 400 year old town square when I'm not working on the computer, and eat food that wasn't extruded from petroleum products when it is dinner time. You can't do that in the US. I've already got the "better living through slack" lifestyle diagonalized.

"Learning, n. The kind of ignorance distinguishing the studious."

campo_de_ems


Total Posts: 5
Joined: Apr 2016
 
Posted: 2019-01-15 01:14
It's possible to apply for a long term visa in France for up to one year. You are still bound to the Schengen rules (90 days in Schengen area within 180 days). So you'd have to return to France (in theory) once you've used up your 90 days and stay there for another 90 before heading off to another Schengen country. Once your inside Schengen, however, this is hardly being checked - let alone tracked in any way so I dont see how they can really enforce this (unless there is a visa label in your passport that is, of course). More info here:

https://france-visas.gouv.fr/en_US/web/france-visas/long-stay-visa

Cheng


Total Posts: 2864
Joined: Feb 2005
 
Posted: 2019-01-15 11:44
If you don't mind Sauerkraut for breakfast have a look here:

https://www.germany-visa.org/job-seeker-visa/

"He's man, he's a kid / Wanna bang with you / Headbanging man" (Grave Digger, Headbanging Man)

svisstack


Total Posts: 318
Joined: Feb 2014
 
Posted: 2019-01-15 11:57
I don't know about the rules, but if you want to live in Poland I could probably help you somehow as I'm resident here

www.coinapi.io && www.cryptotick.com

NeroTulip


Total Posts: 1022
Joined: May 2004
 
Posted: 2019-01-15 14:53
"I just want to drink nice wine in a 400 year old town square when I'm not working on the computer, and eat food that wasn't extruded from petroleum products when it is dinner time"

... and that's why you are numero uno!

More seriously though: getting a visa that allows you to work may be doable, but probably a pain. In addition, you will be taxed in these countries based on residence. The cost may not be that bad (you can offset it against your US taxes), but the admin nightmare of dealing with tax authorities, possibly in a foreign language, is worth thinking about.

If you are really totally mobile on the work front, it may be better to spend 90 days in 4 different countries than a year in one place. For example, Portugal, Switzerland, Hungary and Norway would give you 4 totally different experiences, probably more interesting than a year in France. But that's a question of taste.

"Earth: some bacteria and basic life forms, no sign of intelligent life" (Message from a type III civilization probe sent to the solar system circa 2016)

EspressoLover


Total Posts: 363
Joined: Jan 2015
 
Posted: 2019-01-15 16:09
> If you don't mind Sauerkraut for breakfast have a look here:

"Germany is not only a beautiful country, it is also one of the most powerful countries in Europe."

This is the most German sales pitch I've ever heard.

Good questions outrank easy answers. -Paul Samuelson

nikol


Total Posts: 640
Joined: Jun 2005
 
Posted: 2019-01-15 19:32
Just google '[country_name] visa long term' or '[country_name] visa long term site:[country_root]'

Slovenia:
http://www.mzz.gov.si/en/entry_and_residence/for_visa_applicants/long_stay_visas/

I know two non-EU persons:
My classmate settled there 4 years ago. He likes it.
Another one lives longer, bought a house and trades/moves various goods around EU.

Germany (country_root = de) :
https://www.gtai.de/GTAI/Navigation/EN/Invest/Investment-guide/Coming-to-germany/Who-needs-a-visa/schengen-visa-and-national-visa.html


sloppy


Total Posts: 4
Joined: May 2011
 
Posted: 2019-01-15 19:37
Where do you have in mind? All your "pluses" for living in the EU are probably true individually in different countries, but I'm having trouble picturing that you'll get more than half of them in one specific place. I'm speaking as a US expat who's been living in Europe for over a decade.

I agree with all of @NeroTulip's points. I'd also add that the IRS makes it a nightmare for US expats in terms of filing complexity and uncertainty. The full extent doesn't really become apparent until you've spent more than a year or two overseas. It kind of sneaks up on you when you move thinking it's only going to be a year or two and...whoops, it's been a while hasn't it?

ronin


Total Posts: 435
Joined: May 2006
 
Posted: 2019-01-15 20:49
I actually don't agree with most of those points.

Local work permits and tax issues only arise if you are earning an income locally. If you are not, you are basically treated as a retiree. Most countries are happy with people like that.

Of course, if you are generating non-local income, moving around would help. European countries as a rule suddenly become interested in taxing your global income once you spend continuous 6 months there. The exceptions are the UK and Ireland. Which are not Schengen of course. And Switzerland.

But again, it is not rocket science to put your income into some tax structure and only draw your basic living expenses.

Also, quite a few countries have ancestry schemes, if you can dig up some great-grandparent who was born there.

"There is a SIX am?" -- Arthur

mtsm


Total Posts: 232
Joined: Dec 2010
 
Posted: 2019-01-15 21:57
EL, you assessment is thoroughly wrong.

First of all it's so much more expensive to raise a family in the US than in any European country I can think of. Granted that there are some differences depending on whether that happens somewhere in the mid-west or in a metro-area you would actually enjoy living in. In the US you have to pay literally for everything and it's not cheap. In fact having a family in the US is an extremely poor deal, even with significant differences among European countries. I can elaborate at great length on this.

Secondly, going down the route you describe, is just again so much worse than most equivalent situations you would have in western and northern Europe. Being lower middle-class in the US basically means a certain form of poverty. You need so dramatically more income in the US in order to achieve what you would get with relatively little money in Europe.

Man you are so off.


jslade


Total Posts: 1168
Joined: Feb 2007
 
Posted: 2019-01-16 00:19
Thanks for all the ideas, guys. Just to be clear, the source/s of my income will mostly likely continue to be in the US for the near future. I am indeed completely mobile and more or less want to do what NeroTulip suggests and visit multiple places for at least the first year.

I'm well aware of FACTA and the issues with being an American filing from overseas; some of my best friends are US expats. The long term plan would be to find the goldilocks spot (or spots) which is actually "just right" in terms of non-taxation of worldwide income, and possibly get rid of my US citizenship if it continues to be Soviet in its treatment of expats. The latter is a kind of fantasy, but ...

Most places have some kind of tax dodge, and in any case, I'd rather pay 48% income tax in Portugal than 50% living in California or NYC. At least I'd get something for my money: views and decent food if nothing else.

"Learning, n. The kind of ignorance distinguishing the studious."

mtsm


Total Posts: 232
Joined: Dec 2010
 
Posted: 2019-01-16 20:24
Personally, I find it really difficult to look at countries in such stylized terms. I have lived in 4 countries for extended periods of time and by going to some place you are practically forced to buy into so much more than what can cross your mind when you think about it. Sure the food (as in produce, not restaurants) is much better in France than in most other countries, but that doesn't make France particularly attractive.

I realize that depending on your age, your family situation, etc... you can bubble away for a long time, but eventually you're being dragged deeper and then differences hit you hard.

I have been living in a quasi-bubble in NYC for well over a decade, wonder how I am pulling it off and don't feel particularly good about it. The US is a new world place, so the (cultural) expectations aren't particularly high and there is a critical mass of almost any immigrant community you like, so that makes life in a bubble much easier. It's different in many European countries.

Anyway, just my 2c.

nikol


Total Posts: 640
Joined: Jun 2005
 
Posted: 2019-01-16 23:11
Back in 1992, I have spent 9 months in Pozzuoli (near Campi Flegrei volcano, which they say is going to explode any time soon) and 3 months in Fuorigrotta...
One of the nicest rememberings.

Once you pick up the language and show kindness (listen), locals will do many favorites for you. At some point I had a trouble extending visa for my wife and kid to stay longer with me. In a non-significant chat I complained to chief accountant (old lady) of the institute I was working for. She immediately picked up the phone, called her nephew in Rome (later I was told that he is PM), the guy has called chief of foreign police of Naples (another old lady). Next day I was given 15 minutes personal audience (out of the queue) and granted the wanted prolongation of the visa.

Cheng


Total Posts: 2864
Joined: Feb 2005
 
Posted: 2019-01-17 08:31
Which is the very Italian way to do things... Big Smile

"He's man, he's a kid / Wanna bang with you / Headbanging man" (Grave Digger, Headbanging Man)

Maggette


Total Posts: 1097
Joined: Jun 2007
 
Posted: 2019-01-17 09:10
As an orderly teutonic it's hard to understand that this heart warming story of corruption is supposed to be a good thing.

Ich kam hierher und sah dich und deine Leute lächeln, und sagte mir: Maggette, scheiss auf den small talk, lass lieber deine Fäuste sprechen...

nikol


Total Posts: 640
Joined: Jun 2005
 
Posted: 2019-01-17 17:19
@Maggette

No doubt.
However, they do it in a very nice and an elegant way... Millennial experience makes it all.

ronin


Total Posts: 435
Joined: May 2006
 
Posted: 2019-01-17 20:53
@jslade, in case you were wondering - yes, they will keep this up until you give up on the entire idea.

"There is a SIX am?" -- Arthur

jslade


Total Posts: 1168
Joined: Feb 2007
 
Posted: 2019-01-17 22:38
Lol, ronin it's OK, I will carry vinpao's bags to Italy and thumb my nose at everyone from a Tuscan hill city. Some of the feedback was actually helpful. It's true though that the typical response is to try to talk you out of it for some reason.

FWIIW there are a number of super simple routes to get permanent residency; usually involving real estate or otherwise tying up a half million in capital for a few years (or in the case of Malta, just bribing them). I just figured having a Ph.D. and being a mostly civilized and productive human it would be just as easy to ask some country if I could hang out for longer than 90 day stretches. Seems odd that there is no "180 or 360 day visa for Americans" but maybe Nikol has shown the way.

"Learning, n. The kind of ignorance distinguishing the studious."

ronin


Total Posts: 435
Joined: May 2006
 
Posted: 2019-01-17 23:16
There used to be the Highly Skilled Migrant Programme in the UK - I even used it at one point. But it's long gone. Looks like investor visas are the best bet at this stage.

But tourist visas and flying/driving out every three months is also doable, if your horizon is a year or so. Not for longer though.

Or you can try to pull out some EU ancestry. That always works.

"There is a SIX am?" -- Arthur
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