Forums  > Software  > Any suggestions on online Python 3 course?  
     
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pj


Total Posts: 3470
Joined: Jun 2004
 
Posted: 2019-04-04 19:50
Well, the course needs to have a reasonable price,
which will be funded.

So Udemy, Coursera are in. Personalized high-end courses are out.

My Python 3 level is intermediate.
Meaning was able to write and run a few scripts.

Any particular recommendations on some nice course?
For example Is this one any good?

(I know I know, the real men learn on their own,
but since I need a paper and am lazy)

The older I grow, the more I distrust the familiar doctrine that age brings wisdom Henry L. Mencken

goldorak


Total Posts: 1065
Joined: Nov 2004
 
Posted: 2019-04-05 08:11
Just learn on your own, with a real project. I know, you anticipated that in your post.

Just a note regarding "intermediate level". Is this the intermediate out of "beginner / intermediate / advanced" or "clueless/ / learning / beginner / knowledgeable / intermediate / teacher / pro / advanced / master / jedi / galactus / (just phuck it anc copy/paste from stackoverflow)" scale ? Blush

If you are not living on the edge you are taking up too much space.

goldorak


Total Posts: 1065
Joined: Nov 2004
 
Posted: 2019-04-05 08:11
double post

If you are not living on the edge you are taking up too much space.

TonyC
Nuclear Energy Trader

Total Posts: 1317
Joined: May 2004
 
Posted: 2019-04-05 16:49
> goldorak wrote:
> "... / galactus ... "

my impression is that he's not looking for a full blown galactus level course, but rather more of a "silver surfer as herald" type course

flaneur/boulevardier/remittance man/energy trader

pj


Total Posts: 3470
Joined: Jun 2004
 
Posted: 2019-04-05 17:22
Kids, sigh.

The older I grow, the more I distrust the familiar doctrine that age brings wisdom Henry L. Mencken

nikol


Total Posts: 852
Joined: Jun 2005
 
Posted: 2019-04-05 19:57
Google Python cheat sheets, print them out and learn on the way.

1. Install Anaconda + PyCharm
2. go to Kaggle and try to make some project. https://www.kaggle.com/competitions

If prize money does not motivate you to learn python, courses are useless.

PS.
>My Python 3 level is intermediate.
> Meaning was able to write and run a few scripts.

Running few scripts is just the beginning.

gmetric_Flow


Total Posts: 28
Joined: Oct 2016
 
Posted: 2019-04-05 19:59
What is taught in that course (based on the outline/syllabus) can be learned appreciably quicker from a book or from just trying to get something done and looking up how to do it. You did mention you need a paper, but someone who is lazy would choose to spend less time learning the same thing. Maybe read a book or code on your own and then just click through the course to get the paper...

Maggette


Total Posts: 1167
Joined: Jun 2007
 
Posted: 2019-04-05 20:31
Given your "track record" on the forum I guess a couple (like one or two) of basic tutorials, understanding what python heads mean by "pythonic" and you are ready to go. Basic rules that apply to all interpreters also apply to python. Basic rules of computer sience and good software development practices also apply to python ( I guess that's not that suprising to you).

I think it is more important to learn the inner workings of packages!!!
Numpy, pandas, sci-kit, Numba vs Cython (aka easy to use vs something with a profiler), scipy, dask....

All have their own design ideas you should be aware of to leverage them.

IMHO the real power of python lie in its packages.

Regards

Ich kam hierher und sah dich und deine Leute lächeln, und sagte mir: Maggette, scheiss auf den small talk, lass lieber deine Fäuste sprechen...

Maggette


Total Posts: 1167
Joined: Jun 2007
 
Posted: 2019-04-05 20:39
Edit: regarding sources for packages

For pandas I really liked Wes book on his own product.
To me for Scikit the book of Aurélien Géron was helpfull. But Scikit also has a very very good documentation.

Ich kam hierher und sah dich und deine Leute lächeln, und sagte mir: Maggette, scheiss auf den small talk, lass lieber deine Fäuste sprechen...

secsy


Total Posts: 10
Joined: Mar 2019
 
Posted: 2019-04-05 22:42
I would recommend getting one of the popular basic books on amazon in order to establish a working foundation. This may not seem helpful because it is said a lot, but learning on your own is how you will become proficient. I am by no means an expert with python, but from my experience the times when I made the most progress (in terms of knowledge) was when I tried to make a project I was passionate about using python; for me this was an algorithm for billiards shot decisions.

As long as you keep working on stuff you like, the learning process will be so much more natural than a course and it will give you a better understanding of the language.

Hansi


Total Posts: 303
Joined: Mar 2010
 
Posted: 2019-04-06 02:54
https://www.datacamp.com/home is pretty solid.

pj


Total Posts: 3470
Joined: Jun 2004
 
Posted: 2019-04-09 10:55
Thank you very much, Hansi.
I have enrolled in an online course
and promise to write up my adventures there.

The older I grow, the more I distrust the familiar doctrine that age brings wisdom Henry L. Mencken

Hansi


Total Posts: 303
Joined: Mar 2010
 
Posted: 2019-04-17 17:41
I guess I'll have to take that back:
https://dhavide.github.io/a-note-to-our-commuity-on-building-trust.html
https://juliasilge.com/blog/datacamp-misconduct/

Content still good but company fairly rotten.

nikol


Total Posts: 852
Joined: Jun 2005
 
Posted: 2019-04-30 11:00
Kaggle offers micro-course for those who don't have much time.

https://www.kaggle.com/learn/data-visualization-from-non-coder-to-coder

and full course

https://www.kaggle.com/learn/python

pj


Total Posts: 3470
Joined: Jun 2004
 
Posted: 2019-04-30 15:08
Well, these are not intermediate level courses.

The older I grow, the more I distrust the familiar doctrine that age brings wisdom Henry L. Mencken

contango_and_cash


Total Posts: 114
Joined: Sep 2015
 
Posted: 2019-04-30 15:56
What do you want to learn and what gains do you want from using python?

nikol


Total Posts: 852
Joined: Jun 2005
 
Posted: 2019-04-30 19:10
@pj

you are picky, huh? :)

pj


Total Posts: 3470
Joined: Jun 2004
 
Posted: 2019-04-30 19:39
@nikol,

Usually you don't read posts, you only write them. eh? Tongue out

The older I grow, the more I distrust the familiar doctrine that age brings wisdom Henry L. Mencken

nikol


Total Posts: 852
Joined: Jun 2005
 
Posted: 2019-05-01 12:17
I am happy to contribute to NP. Hope, it is not identified as spam ))

finanzmaster


Total Posts: 168
Joined: Feb 2011
 
Posted: 2019-05-11 20:25
Well, from my personal experience I would recommend just to quickly get familiar with python basics (in particular with the data structures like tuples and lists) and then to get started with a simple but a meaningful project.

I am currently extending my Python knowledge too.
Not only because most of ML code is written in Python but also because I recognize the advantages of its clear syntax.
To put it briefly: when I need a "conventional" statistical analysis, I use and will likely further use R.
But if I need to do something with Keras or to write some general script, python seems to be more suitable.

www.yetanotherquant.com - Knowledge rather than Hope: A Book for Retail Investors and Mathematical Finance Students
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